What’s the case for Constructive Capitalism? Why should you be a Constructive Capitalist? 
The simplest reason is: because Constructive Capitalists don’t just outperform—they redraw the boundaries of disruptive outperformance.
The chart shows the performance of Constructive Capitalists vis a vis market indices (the Nasdaq, S&P 500, and Dow Jones) over the last decade. Here’s the rub. A broad enough basket of equities can only go up, right? Wrong. In a stark contradiction of the conventional wisdom, the noughties were the worst decade in financial history. If you’d put $1000 into the markets in 2000, you would have, for the first time in recent financial history, lost roughly 20-30% of your money, and been left with only $700-800 at the end of the decade.
But if you’d invested the same $1000 in the Constructive Capitalist portfolio—a cohort of radical institutional innovators, focused on constructive advantage, smart growth, and thick value—you would have more than tripled your returns (or, in the Street’s jargon, achieved an “alpha” of over 300%). 
Yet, that’s just the beginning of the story. What’s more significant is that the performance of Constructive Capitalists isn’t just countercyclical, skyrocketing during the downturn, and then collapsing during today’s nascent, halting recovery. Rather, they are rebounding harder and more intensely than the markets—suggesting that their performance is structurally disruptive. They’ve built stronger economic foundations, that underpin structural outperformance, deeply rooted superiority in 21st century terms—because, as I discuss in the Manifesto, Constructive Capitalists aren’t just seeking industrial age efficiency, productivity, and effectiveness: they’re taking a quantum leap beyond them.
Want to join them? The lessons are simple. If you’re a C-suiter, get constructive. If you’re an entrepreneur, seek a constructive advantage. If you’re an investor, invest in constructive firms, markets, and economies. And if you don’t, won’t, or can’t—well, then, maybe you should prepare to be structurally disrupted.
Why does mattering matter? There’s a lot more to the case for Constructive Capitalism, of course, than mere financial superiority—competitive context, social relevance, engaged people, stronger foundations, more enduring growth. But if you’re looking for a place to begin, you can start with the hard truth that even in 20th century terms, 21st century renegades outperform—disruptively. 

What’s the case for Constructive Capitalism? Why should you be a Constructive Capitalist? 

The simplest reason is: because Constructive Capitalists don’t just outperform—they redraw the boundaries of disruptive outperformance.

The chart shows the performance of Constructive Capitalists vis a vis market indices (the Nasdaq, S&P 500, and Dow Jones) over the last decade. Here’s the rub. A broad enough basket of equities can only go up, right? Wrong. In a stark contradiction of the conventional wisdom, the noughties were the worst decade in financial history. If you’d put $1000 into the markets in 2000, you would have, for the first time in recent financial history, lost roughly 20-30% of your money, and been left with only $700-800 at the end of the decade.

But if you’d invested the same $1000 in the Constructive Capitalist portfolio—a cohort of radical institutional innovators, focused on constructive advantage, smart growth, and thick value—you would have more than tripled your returns (or, in the Street’s jargon, achieved an “alpha” of over 300%). 

Yet, that’s just the beginning of the story. What’s more significant is that the performance of Constructive Capitalists isn’t just countercyclical, skyrocketing during the downturn, and then collapsing during today’s nascent, halting recovery. Rather, they are rebounding harder and more intensely than the markets—suggesting that their performance is structurally disruptive. They’ve built stronger economic foundations, that underpin structural outperformance, deeply rooted superiority in 21st century terms—because, as I discuss in the Manifesto, Constructive Capitalists aren’t just seeking industrial age efficiency, productivity, and effectiveness: they’re taking a quantum leap beyond them.

Want to join them? The lessons are simple. If you’re a C-suiter, get constructive. If you’re an entrepreneur, seek a constructive advantage. If you’re an investor, invest in constructive firms, markets, and economies. And if you don’t, won’t, or can’t—well, then, maybe you should prepare to be structurally disrupted.

Why does mattering matter? There’s a lot more to the case for Constructive Capitalism, of course, than mere financial superiority—competitive context, social relevance, engaged people, stronger foundations, more enduring growth. But if you’re looking for a place to begin, you can start with the hard truth that even in 20th century terms, 21st century renegades outperform—disruptively.